Thursday, 10 August 2017

Horsing Around

You may remember The White Horse Of Kilburn post which I wrote back in 2014. Here is a photo of the horse, which is cut in to the hillside, which I took when I last visited.


I said in that post that we would return to take a walk right up to the horse itself, and I also included Touch the white horse of Kilburn on my 50 Before 50 list, so we went back again yesterday to do just that. I didn't manage to actually touch it, but we got pretty close to it.

There's a car park right below the horse so you don't have to venture too far in order to reach it.


You can take a moderate one and a half mile round walk which brings you back to the car park, a longer strenuous six mile walk, or do as we did and climb up and then down again.


The white horse was cut in 1857 by a local schoolmaster and his class after being designed and financed by a native of Kilburn, Thomas Taylor, who was a Victorian businessman.


It doesn't look it here but the path at the start is very steep, all my huffing and puffing shows just how unfit I am.


We kept getting a glimpse of the horse as we walked further on.


As we turned and looked from where we had come, we got a fantastic view over the Vale of York. This didn't do anything at all for my fear of heights.


After the initial pathway, you come to some steps, 151 to be exact.


We'd let Archie off his lead at the start of the walk but even though he's very good and doesn't usually wander off, we thought it would be safer for him to be on his lead, there's some steep drops, so he was put back on.


This is the view behind us as we neared the top.


The white horse which we'd come to see. I couldn't actually touch it but I got pretty close.


There's a bench at the top dedicated to Fred Banks, Guardian Of The White Horse.



Fred Banks was a Yorkshire farmer who died at the age of 81 back in 2007. He was a rural historian and president of the Kilburn White Horse Association. His maternal grandfather, Thomas Goodrick, was amongst the school children who helped cut it out and his father, Tom, "took care" of it. Fred followed in his father's footsteps in looking after it.


There's a fantastic view from the bench.


Archie had a little trouble with the steps on the way down so he was more than happy to be a pampered pooch and let Mick carry him.


That's number 22 crossed off my 50 Before 50 list but it wasn't the end of our day out, more photos to follow in another post.

40 comments:

  1. You choose your day well, it must be horrible in the rain. Glad you have another off your list.

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    1. We'd been watching the forecast. It was a terrible day on Tuesday so Mick worked from home, he'll be able to claim a days holiday back for that. Things are slowly getting ticked off the list, though there's still lots of things on there to do.

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  2. What a lovely walk and simply fabulous views... and no rain!
    It's been so wet in my part of the UK especially yesterday!

    Your pictures are lovely and that is quite a climb.
    Such a sweet photo of Mick and Archie.

    Enjoy your Thursday

    All the best Jan

    P.S. Your 50 before 50 list is getting shorter.

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    1. The views were stunning, though they did make my tummy flip a little. We had a very rainy day on Tuesday, it didn't let up all day, but it wasn't bad yesterday and it's been lovely again today. I'm trying to work my way through my 50 before 50 list, there'll be an update soon.

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  3. I'd have been huffing and puffing too, Jo. Thanks for taking me there without me having to put in the effort! LOL

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    1. Ha ha, effort was definitely needed, I'm glad there was a bench at the top so that I could have a rest.

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  4. The view was well worth the climb and all those steps, and at least the weather was kind to you.
    Did you reward yourselves with an ice cream after that walk from that cute little van at the bottom of the hill?

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    1. It turned out to be a lovely day, if a little windy. There was no ice cream purchased from the van in the car park, though we did indulge later on in the day.

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  5. How wonderful, you must be elated getting through your list. Mine would have to be 70 before 70, that's quite scarry in itself.

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    1. It's like a little victory each time I cross something off the list. Perhaps I should start a 60 before 60 list just as soon as I've completed this one.

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  6. The Kilburn white horse is truly dramatic. I remember seeing it many years ago.
    Is your 50 by 50 list on your blog? I'd love to see it!

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    1. It's quite a sight when you glimpse it on the hillside. There's a link to the first part of my 50 Before 50 list in the second paragraph of this post and the second part follows on from that post.

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    2. You're welcome. Hope you can find the posts okay.

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  7. We've visited the Uffington White Horse on numerous occasions, but never the Kilburn, so I enjoyed your photos.

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    1. I believe there's a few white horses cut in to hillsides around the country but I've only ever seen the one at Kilburn.

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  8. I'm sure Archie is posing for the camera there, pouting even! A place I'd love to go and visit and what spectacular views xx

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    1. Ha ha, he's probably learnt that from Eleanor. Kilburn is a lovely place to visit, as well as the white horse there's also the Mouseman Visitor Centre. Robert Thompson, the furniture maker, lived here. He was known as The Mouseman because he carved a little mouse into the furniture which he made.

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  9. A most enjoyable post and lovely pictures. I think that I would be huffing and puffing going up those steps after that steep pathway.
    That's certainly an amazing view from the top. xx

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    1. It's a very steep climb and not for the faint hearted, though the views are spectacular, you're certainly rewarded if you can make it.

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  10. What beautiful views, I expect you didn't realise you'd be so high up, wel, worth the trek though.

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    1. I did realise how high up I'd be but didn't realise how much I'd feel it, it did nothing for my fear of heights but I'm glad I managed it.

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  11. Well done Jo, I'm out of breath just reading your post. The views are outstanding.

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    1. The views made the climb very worthwhile, the scenery was breathtaking.

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  12. What an experience and such a lovely story behind it too. I wonder if one of Mr. Banks children or grandchildren are going to follow in his footsteps.

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    1. The Kilburn White Horse Association looks after the horse now but it would be lovely to think that one of Fred Banks' children or grandchildren were a part of it.

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  13. Hello Jo, I've just returned to blogging. Thoroughly enjoyed your post.. what a lovely walk. We used to go to Oxfordshire for holidays (my late father was from there).. and I knew when I saw the White Horse at Uffington we were getting close. Happy memories. :o)

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    1. Lovely to see you blogging again. The horse at Kilburn is the only one I've ever seen, though I know there are more around the country, they're quite a sight, aren't they?

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    2. It would be nice to see more of them.

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  14. What a stunning view you got from the bench, well worth all the huffing and puffing. Mind you 151 steps, I bet you were glad when you reached the last one! I would have been asked to be picked up and carried too, Archie definitely had the best deal!
    Lisa x

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    1. Archie's such a pampered pooch. I'd have been very grateful for a piggy back, though I don't think Mick's knees would have taken my weight. I'm glad I managed to make it to the top, the view was well worth it.

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  15. Ooh, I enjoyed that walk, or should I say, 'climb' with you & have noted it for next time we are over, along with lots of others we want to do. The views are amazing from that height & if I can do the 199 steps at Whitby, I should be able to venture up those ones, before I get too old(giggle). Have a great weekend & take care.

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    1. You'd enjoy Kilburn village too, Robert Thompson, known as The Mouseman, lived there and there's a visitor centre. It's a picture perfect little village with some beautiful cottages.

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  16. A great achievement and another off your list! You enjoyed some fabulous views from the top. I think my legs would have been shaking after all those steps. X

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    1. I did have to keep stopping on the way up to catch my breath as well as clinging on to the handrail to steady myself, I don't have a great head for heights.

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  17. Wow! Well done you, what an achievement, such fantastic views. I can imagine how difficult it was though. I hate steps!!! xxx

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    1. It was the steepness and the height which got me, though I thought it would be harder to reach the horse than it actually was. Still, it's another one off the list so I'm pleased about that.

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  18. Great view after your strenuous climb.

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    1. It was a fantastic view, certainly worth the climb.

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